Marie-louise-élisabeth vigée-lebrun

Marie-louise-élisabeth vigée-lebrun

Julie le brun

Élisabeth Louise Vigée Le Brun was one of the great portrait artists of her day, easily the equal of Quentin de La Tour or Jean Baptiste Greuze. Born into relatively modest circumstances, she firmly established herself in society’s upper crust. After earning the favours of the king and his family, she became the official artist of Queen Marie Antoinette.

Élisabeth Louise Vigée was the daughter of Louis Vigée, a pastel artist and member of the Académie de Saint-Luc, and his wife Jeanne Maissin, of countryman origin. Baptised at the church of Saint-Eustache in Paris, at the age of six Élisabeth entered the Trinity Convent School on Rue de Charonne, in the Saint-Antoine district of the capital. From an early age the young artist painted on every available surface, from her school books to the walls of her school. This precocious gift prompted her father to declare, prophetically: “If anybody was born to be a painter, my child, it’s you.” The young Elisabeth was very attached to her father, who died when she was just twelve years old. Fortunately he had had time enough to recognise his daughter’s artistic talent and to teach her the basics of art, especially with pastels, his own speciality. Naturally enough, the young artist’s first subjects were her friends and family. Among them was the art dealer Jean Baptiste Pierre Le Brun, whom she married in 1776.

where did elisabeth vigée le brun work

Élisabeth Louise Vigée Le Brun (also spelled Vigée-Lebrun; French: [elizabɛt lwiz viʒe ləbʁœ̃]; 16 April 1755 – 30 March 1842),[1] also known as Madame Le Brun, was a prominent French portrait painter of the late 18th century.

Her artistic style is generally considered part of the aftermath of Rococo with elements of an adopted Neoclassical style.[2] Her subject matter and color palette can be classified as Rococo, but her style is aligned with the emergence of Neoclassicism. Vigée Le Brun created a name for herself in Ancien Régime society by serving as the portrait painter to Marie Antoinette. She enjoyed the patronage of European aristocrats, actors, and writers, and was elected to art academies in ten cities.[3]

Vigée Le Brun created some 660 portraits and 200 landscapes.[4] In addition to many works in private collections, her paintings are owned by major museums, such as the Louvre, Hermitage Museum, National Gallery in London, Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, and many other collections in continental Europe and the United States.

what was elisabeth vigée le brun style and medium

Élisabeth Louise Vigée Le Brun (also spelled Vigée-Lebrun; French: [elizabɛt lwiz viʒe ləbʁœ̃]; 16 April 1755 – 30 March 1842),[1] also known as Madame Le Brun, was a prominent French portrait painter of the late 18th century.

Her artistic style is generally considered part of the aftermath of Rococo with elements of an adopted Neoclassical style.[2] Her subject matter and color palette can be classified as Rococo, but her style is aligned with the emergence of Neoclassicism. Vigée Le Brun created a name for herself in Ancien Régime society by serving as the portrait painter to Marie Antoinette. She enjoyed the patronage of European aristocrats, actors, and writers, and was elected to art academies in ten cities.[3]

Vigée Le Brun created some 660 portraits and 200 landscapes.[4] In addition to many works in private collections, her paintings are owned by major museums, such as the Louvre, Hermitage Museum, National Gallery in London, Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, and many other collections in continental Europe and the United States.

julie le brunpainter

Élisabeth Louise Vigée Le Brun (also spelled Vigée-Lebrun; French: [elizabɛt lwiz viʒe ləbʁœ̃]; 16 April 1755 – 30 March 1842),[1] also known as Madame Le Brun, was a prominent French portrait painter of the late 18th century.

Her artistic style is generally considered part of the aftermath of Rococo with elements of an adopted Neoclassical style.[2] Her subject matter and color palette can be classified as Rococo, but her style is aligned with the emergence of Neoclassicism. Vigée Le Brun created a name for herself in Ancien Régime society by serving as the portrait painter to Marie Antoinette. She enjoyed the patronage of European aristocrats, actors, and writers, and was elected to art academies in ten cities.[3]

Vigée Le Brun created some 660 portraits and 200 landscapes.[4] In addition to many works in private collections, her paintings are owned by major museums, such as the Louvre, Hermitage Museum, National Gallery in London, Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, and many other collections in continental Europe and the United States.

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