Museum of contemporary art los angeles

Museum of contemporary art los angeles

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The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles (MOCA) is a contemporary art museum with two locations in greater Los Angeles, California. The main branch is located on Grand Avenue in Downtown Los Angeles, near the Walt Disney Concert Hall. MOCA’s original space, initially intended as a «temporary» exhibit space while the main facility was built, is now known as the Geffen Contemporary, in the Little Tokyo district of downtown Los Angeles. Between 2000 and 2019, it operated a satellite facility at the Pacific Design Center facility in West Hollywood.[1]
The museum’s exhibits consist primarily of American and European contemporary art created after 1940. Since the museum’s inception, MOCA’s programming has been defined by its multi-disciplinary approach to contemporary art.
The following year, the fledgling Museum of Contemporary Art was operating out of an office on Boyd Street. The city’s most prominent philanthropists and collectors had been assembled into a Board of Trustees in 1980, and set a goal of raising $10 million in their first year; an artists advisory council was involved early on.[2] A working staff was brought together; Richard Koshalek was appointed chief curator; relationships were made with artists and galleries; and negotiations were begun to secure artwork and an exhibition space. Following Weisman’s initiative, $1-million contributions from Eli Broad, Max Palevsky, and Atlantic Richfield Co. helped securing the construction of the new museum;[3] Broad became MOCA’s founding chairman; Palevsky chaired the architectural search committee.[4] Many of MOCA’s initial donors were young and supporting the arts for the first time; a substantial number joined up at the $10,000 «founder» minimum.[2]

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The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles (MOCA) is a contemporary art museum with two locations in greater Los Angeles, California. The main branch is located on Grand Avenue in Downtown Los Angeles, near the Walt Disney Concert Hall. MOCA’s original space, initially intended as a «temporary» exhibit space while the main facility was built, is now known as the Geffen Contemporary, in the Little Tokyo district of downtown Los Angeles. Between 2000 and 2019, it operated a satellite facility at the Pacific Design Center facility in West Hollywood.[1]
The museum’s exhibits consist primarily of American and European contemporary art created after 1940. Since the museum’s inception, MOCA’s programming has been defined by its multi-disciplinary approach to contemporary art.
The following year, the fledgling Museum of Contemporary Art was operating out of an office on Boyd Street. The city’s most prominent philanthropists and collectors had been assembled into a Board of Trustees in 1980, and set a goal of raising $10 million in their first year; an artists advisory council was involved early on.[2] A working staff was brought together; Richard Koshalek was appointed chief curator; relationships were made with artists and galleries; and negotiations were begun to secure artwork and an exhibition space. Following Weisman’s initiative, $1-million contributions from Eli Broad, Max Palevsky, and Atlantic Richfield Co. helped securing the construction of the new museum;[3] Broad became MOCA’s founding chairman; Palevsky chaired the architectural search committee.[4] Many of MOCA’s initial donors were young and supporting the arts for the first time; a substantial number joined up at the $10,000 «founder» minimum.[2]

Museum of contemporary art los angeles 2021

The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles (MOCA) is a contemporary art museum with two locations in greater Los Angeles, California. The main branch is located on Grand Avenue in Downtown Los Angeles, near the Walt Disney Concert Hall. MOCA’s original space, initially intended as a «temporary» exhibit space while the main facility was built, is now known as the Geffen Contemporary, in the Little Tokyo district of downtown Los Angeles. Between 2000 and 2019, it operated a satellite facility at the Pacific Design Center facility in West Hollywood.[1]
The museum’s exhibits consist primarily of American and European contemporary art created after 1940. Since the museum’s inception, MOCA’s programming has been defined by its multi-disciplinary approach to contemporary art.
The following year, the fledgling Museum of Contemporary Art was operating out of an office on Boyd Street. The city’s most prominent philanthropists and collectors had been assembled into a Board of Trustees in 1980, and set a goal of raising $10 million in their first year; an artists advisory council was involved early on.[2] A working staff was brought together; Richard Koshalek was appointed chief curator; relationships were made with artists and galleries; and negotiations were begun to secure artwork and an exhibition space. Following Weisman’s initiative, $1-million contributions from Eli Broad, Max Palevsky, and Atlantic Richfield Co. helped securing the construction of the new museum;[3] Broad became MOCA’s founding chairman; Palevsky chaired the architectural search committee.[4] Many of MOCA’s initial donors were young and supporting the arts for the first time; a substantial number joined up at the $10,000 «founder» minimum.[2]

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Established in 1979, MOCA is the only artist-founded museum in Los Angeles dedicated to collecting and exhibiting contemporary art. MOCA houses one of the most compelling collections of contemporary art in the world, comprising roughly 7000 objects, and has a diverse history of ground-breaking, historically-significant exhibitions.
Committed to the collection, presentation, and interpretation of art created after 1940, in all media, and to preserving that work for future generations, MOCA provides leadership in the field by identifying and presenting the most significant and challenging art of our time, actively supporting the creation of new work, and producing original scholarship.
With three distinct venues in Los Angeles—MOCA Grand Avenue, The Geffen Contemporary at MOCA, and MOCA Pacific Design Center—and Michael Heizer’s seminal artwork Double Negative (1969-70) in the Nevada desert, MOCA engages audiences through an ambitious program of exhibitions, educational programs, and publishing.

Museum of contemporary art los angeles 2022

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