Sainte chapelle paris exterior

Sainte chapelle paris exterior

Sainte-chapelle architecture

Construction began sometime after 1238 and the chapel was consecrated on 26 April 1248.[2] The Sainte-Chapelle is considered among the highest achievements of the Rayonnant period of Gothic architecture. It was commissioned by King Louis IX of France to house his collection of Passion relics, including Christ’s Crown of Thorns – one of the most important relics in medieval Christendom, later hosted in the nearby Notre-Dame Cathedral until the 2019 fire, which it survived.[3]
The Sainte-Chapelle is no longer a church. It was secularised after the French Revolution, and is now operated by the French Centre of National Monuments, along with the nearby Conciergerie, the other remaining vestige of the original palace.
The two levels of the new chapel equal in size, had entirely different purposes. The upper level, where the sacred relics were kept was reserved exclusively for the royal family and their guests. The lower level was used by the courtiers, servants, and soldiers of the palace. It was a very large structure, 36 meters long, 17 meters wide, and 42.5 meters high, ranking in size with the new Gothic cathedrals in France.[4]

sainte-chapelle tickets

If you’re new here, you may be interested in downloading the guide «20 Amazing Offbeat Places in Paris». Click here to get your free copy now! Thanks for visiting!Welcome back to the French Moments blog! As this is not the first time you are here, you may be interested in downloading the guide «20 Amazing Offbeat Places in Paris». Click here to get your free copy now! With its stunning stained-glass, the Sainte-Chapelle is gem of Gothic architecture in the heart of Paris. Welcoming over 900,000 visitors each year, the medieval chapel is one of Paris’ most magical sights. Its magnificent stained-glass windows are among the oldest in Paris.
The Sainte-Chapelle (Holy Chapel) was commissioned by King Louis IX (Saint-Louis) possibly from architect Pierre of Montreuil between 1242 and 1248 in the Palais de la Cité, then the royal residence. Consecrated in 1248, the sacred shrine was designed to house the relics of the Passion of Christ. In 1239, the devout king acquired from the Emperor of Constantinople the Crown of Thorns and in 1241 a fragment of the Holy Cross and the Holy Lance. Saint-Louis paid nearly three times the cost of building the Sainte-Chapelle.

what is the sainte-chapelle used for today

Built on the Ile de la Cité in the heart of the French capital, the Sainte-Chapelle de Paris, also known as the Sainte-Chapelle du Palais was specially built to house Christian artefacts like the Crown of Thorns and a piece of the True Cross as well as other relics related to the crucifixion of Christ.
At the beginning of the 13th century, Emperor Baudouin II de Courtenay, the last emperor of Constantinople urgently needs money and in order to get it, he offers to sell his most precious religious artefact: the Crown of Thorns, placed on Jesus’ head before the crucifixion. In 1237, the Emperor leaves for a European voyage hoping to find a buyer and an ally to join him in his latest crusade. He meets with French king Louis IX. While the king is not interested in joining the emperor’s crusade, he is interested in the Crown of Thorns and other relics for sale in Venice. For 135 000 pounds, the crown of the thorns is brought to France, arriving in Paris in 1239.
The day after the arrival of the crown in Paris, a great ceremony is organized, during which the relic is placed in the chapel of Saint-Nicolas de la Cité. Three years later, two new artefacts sold by the emperor arrive in Paris: Relics of the Passion of Christ and a part of the True Cross (on which Jesus was crucified). These were considered to be direct proof of the story of Jesus and his crucifixion. These three relics, now owned by the king, are particularly important to Christians. Louis IX decides to place these precious items in a more prestigious location than the little Saint-Nicolas Chapel. Thus, the king calls for the construction of a new chapel within the old Palais Royal de l’Ile de la Cité, specially designed to house these sacred items.

sainte-chapelle rose window

Construction began sometime after 1238 and the chapel was consecrated on 26 April 1248.[2] The Sainte-Chapelle is considered among the highest achievements of the Rayonnant period of Gothic architecture. It was commissioned by King Louis IX of France to house his collection of Passion relics, including Christ’s Crown of Thorns – one of the most important relics in medieval Christendom, later hosted in the nearby Notre-Dame Cathedral until the 2019 fire, which it survived.[3]
The Sainte-Chapelle is no longer a church. It was secularised after the French Revolution, and is now operated by the French Centre of National Monuments, along with the nearby Conciergerie, the other remaining vestige of the original palace.
The two levels of the new chapel equal in size, had entirely different purposes. The upper level, where the sacred relics were kept was reserved exclusively for the royal family and their guests. The lower level was used by the courtiers, servants, and soldiers of the palace. It was a very large structure, 36 meters long, 17 meters wide, and 42.5 meters high, ranking in size with the new Gothic cathedrals in France.[4]

Sainte chapelle paris exterior 2021

Acerca del autor

admin

Ver todos los artículos